(Blogathon ’16) Jonathan Weeks: The Greatest Man I Have Known

This guest-post is part of the 2016 Baseball Continuum Blogathon For Charity, benefiting the Roswell Park Alliance Foundation. The Roswell Park Alliance Foundation is the charitable arm of Roswell Park Cancer Institute and funds raised will be “put to immediate use to increase the pace from research trials into improved clinical care, to ensure state-of-the-art facilities, and to help improve the quality of life for patients and their families.” Please donate through the Blogathon’s GoFundMe page. Also, please note that the opinions and statements of the writer are not necessarily those of the Baseball Continuum or it’s webmaster.

The Greatest Man I Have Known
by Jonathan Weeks

Don Weeks
(Nov. 23, 1938 – Mar. 11, 2015) 

When my father was born in 1938, the Yankees were finishing up a run of four consecutive world championships. He vividly remembered the teams of the late-’40s/ early-’50s and would regale me with stories of their on-field adventures. Though I began my formative years as a fan of Cincinnati’s “Big Red Machine,” I was officially converted in 1976 when my father took me to Yankee Stadium for the first time. I still remember the smell of hot dogs and beer, the shouts of refreshment vendors hawking their wares and the row of billboards lining the facade in center field (among them ads for Brut cologne and Marlboro cigarettes). Most of all, I remember my father’s passion as he told me about the exceptional men who had worn pinstripes over the years. Though I was only eleven at the time, I left the stadium with a vague notion that the game of baseball is a metaphor for life itself–how some men rise to the occasion while others wilt in the spotlight. Throughout my childhood and into my adult years, my father was one of the heroes. He taught me about courage, perseverance and fair play. He led by example–especially during his twilight months when he endured the unexpected loss of his beloved wife (my Mom) while fighting bravely through chemotherapy and radiation. Even as he lay dying, his body ravaged by an insidious disease known as Merkle Cell Cancer, he had a kind word for everyone who entered the room. When he eventually became incapable of speech, he offered smiles instead.

In honor of this great man, I would like to share the boxscore from the first game we attended together:

Screen Shot 2016-01-29 at 10.45.57 PMFor anyone interested, I (Jonathan Weeks) am the author of several baseball books—three nonfiction works and one novel. My latest nonfiction project is being released in the summer of 2016 by Rowman and Littlefield. It’s entitled “Baseball’s Dynasties and the Men Who Built Them”. (The title kind of says it all) You can access my blog at jonathanweeks.blogspot.com.

This guest-post has been part of the 2016 Baseball Continuum Blogathon For Charity, benefiting the Roswell Park Alliance Foundation. The Roswell Park Alliance Foundation is the charitable arm of Roswell Park Cancer Institute and funds raised will be “put to immediate use to increase the pace from research trials into improved clinical care, to ensure state-of-the-art facilities, and to help improve the quality of life for patients and their families.” Please donate through the Blogathon’s GoFundMe page. Also, please note that the opinions and statements of the writer were not necessarily those of the Baseball Continuum or it’s webmaster.

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3 thoughts on “(Blogathon ’16) Jonathan Weeks: The Greatest Man I Have Known

  1. Pingback: Pieces of the Blogathon you may have missed | The Baseball Continuum

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  3. Pingback: Wisdom and Links: Every Piece from the 2016 Blogathon - Hall of Very Good

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