Famous for Something Else: Michael Jordan

If you don’t know who Michael Jordan is, you have either been in a coma for the last thirty years or you have come from another planet (although even people from other planets knew who Jordan was in his prime). It’s his 50th birthday today. Go below the jump for stuff on him:

Anyway, here are his stats with the Birmingham Barons in 1994:

Year Age Tm Lg Lev Aff G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS TB GDP HBP SH SF IBB
1994 31 Birmingham SOUL AA CHW 127 497 436 46 88 17 1 3 51 30 18 51 114 .202 .289 .266 .556 116 4 4 3 3 0
1 Season 127 497 436 46 88 17 1 3 51 30 18 51 114 .202 .289 .266 .556 116 4 4 3 3 0
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 2/15/2013.

Interestingly, there is some evidence to suggest that Michael was getting better as he went on. In the Arizona Fall League, for example, he hit .252. While that is hardly something that would have gotten him called up to the big leagues, it is quite an improvement over his .202 Southern League average. And it is remarkable in itself that any 31-year old would hit even .202 against AA pitching after not having played competitive baseball since High School. In fact, to this day his manager, Terry Francona, admires the fact that Jordan was able to do that. If you watch the Ron Shelton documentary Jordan Rides The Bus, you get the feeling that maybe, had he stuck with it, Michael would have eventually made it to the Big Leagues. Not as a star, and probably not even as a regular, but in some sort of role.

That said, I think everybody can agree it was a good move of his to go back to the NBA.

2 thoughts on “Famous for Something Else: Michael Jordan

  1. Definitely a good move to return to the NBA. I actually saw him play against the Greenville Braves in ’94. He went hit-less but made a pretty impressive catch in the outfield. I would say he made the right move leading the Bulls to a few more NBA championships

  2. Pingback: The Famous For Something Else Index (as of April 24, 2013) | The Baseball Continuum

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