How many trout can Mike Trout now buy?

Mike Trout is about to sign a $430 million contract, keeping him an Angel for likely the rest of his career.

Which leads to an important question: How much trout (the fish) could Trout (the ballplayer) buy with all of that money?

Ultimately, it depends on whether we are talking about whether he wants to buy trout as food or trout as fish.

The food is easy enough. Presuming that Mike Trout has Amazon Prime (and why wouldn’t he?), he could get 3.7 ounce Roland Rainbow Trout Fillets smoked and sliced for $7.08.  That means that (if he doesn’t get taxed on his salary- and he will be) he could buy 60.73 million (60,730,000) of those. That’s 224,701,000 ounces of trout- 6,270 (long) tons. That’s a bit over half the weight of all the trash that New York City creates in a day. That’s a lot of fish.

Then, there is the questions of actual Trout. According to a trout hatchery that I found on Google that offers trout for pond/lake stocking, the price of rainbow trout varies both on how long the trout and how many are being ordered. So, depending on what type of trout that Trout wants, it could be anywhere from a maximum of 296,600,000 rainbow trouts between 4 to 6 inches to a minimum of 107,500,000 rainbow trouts between 10 to 12 inches. Technically the trout could get bigger, but that’s a “call for pricing” thing. I’m curious if that would even be possible. I imagine it would technically be, as trout are very widespread both commercially and in the wild. But then again, I’m not an expert here. Maybe Mike Trout could corner the entire trout market.

So, in short: Mike Trout is going to be helluva rich and be able to buy a helluva lot of trout.

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MVPs of the Weekend (August 7, 8 and 9, 2015)

The MVPs of the weekend, in order, are Mike Trout, Stephen Strasburg, and Corey Kluber.

 

Standings, as always, after the jump:

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All-Star Wrap-Up and MVP of Yesterday update

Well, that was fun.

To be sure, there have been many better All-Star Games. But there have also been many worse All-Star Games as well. And, what’s more, the festivities themselves were above average- the Home Run Derby, for example, has been reborn thanks to the brackets and time limits. It certainly isn’t perfect, but for the first time in quite awhile, I felt like I was watching the Home Run Derby beyond the first round because I was enjoying it, not simply because it was on.

And then there is Mike Trout. He batted four times last night, and in some ways the game became his showcase. He homered, he walked, he beat out a throw to first to avoid a double play. He rightfully was named MVP, his second in a row (the first player to do that), and he’s only 24. It is not out of the realm of possibility that, one day, the quote “The All-Star Game was made for Willie Mays” will instead be “The All-Star Game was made for Mike Trout.”

Not surprisingly, Trout is the MVP of Yesterday, just as he was the MVP of the game. Standings, as always, after the jump:

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