How many trout can Mike Trout now buy?

Mike Trout is about to sign a $430 million contract, keeping him an Angel for likely the rest of his career.

Which leads to an important question: How much trout (the fish) could Trout (the ballplayer) buy with all of that money?

Ultimately, it depends on whether we are talking about whether he wants to buy trout as food or trout as fish.

The food is easy enough. Presuming that Mike Trout has Amazon Prime (and why wouldn’t he?), he could get 3.7 ounce Roland Rainbow Trout Fillets smoked and sliced for $7.08.  That means that (if he doesn’t get taxed on his salary- and he will be) he could buy 60.73 million (60,730,000) of those. That’s 224,701,000 ounces of trout- 6,270 (long) tons. That’s a bit over half the weight of all the trash that New York City creates in a day. That’s a lot of fish.

Then, there is the questions of actual Trout. According to a trout hatchery that I found on Google that offers trout for pond/lake stocking, the price of rainbow trout varies both on how long the trout and how many are being ordered. So, depending on what type of trout that Trout wants, it could be anywhere from a maximum of 296,600,000 rainbow trouts between 4 to 6 inches to a minimum of 107,500,000 rainbow trouts between 10 to 12 inches. Technically the trout could get bigger, but that’s a “call for pricing” thing. I’m curious if that would even be possible. I imagine it would technically be, as trout are very widespread both commercially and in the wild. But then again, I’m not an expert here. Maybe Mike Trout could corner the entire trout market.

So, in short: Mike Trout is going to be helluva rich and be able to buy a helluva lot of trout.

Continuucast 6 with Brandon DuBreuil (@brandondubreuil) of CPBL English!

It’s time for another Continuucast, this time featuring Brandon DuBreuil of CPBL English! Hit play above, download by right-clicking here, follow the RSS feed here or follow on iTunes here or Stitcher here (if the latest episode isn’t up yet, it will be shortly).

This time on the Continuucast:

 

-Dan Glickman goes beyond the sea (through Skype) to talk Taiwanese baseball with Brandon DuBreuil (pronounced Du-BRAY), one of the co-founders of CPBLenglish.com. Topics include how Brandon got to Taiwan, why CPBL English is opening now, notable names both foreign and domestic in the CPBL, and interesting traditions in Taiwanese baseball.

 

-Dan gets the Angels out of the way for “30 Teams, 30 Posts” by briefly talking about how the Angels may have wasted their opportunity with Mike Trout.

 

-Dan previews the next episode, which will be a SEASON OPENING EXTRAVAGANZA with multiple guests (not all at the same time).

 

Music/Sounds Featured:

 

“The National Game” by John Phillip Sousa

 

Instrumental version of “La Mer/Beyond The Sea” by Django Reinhart

 

“The Mike Trout Song” by Conn.B.

 

The death music from Super Mario Brothers

 

Excerpt of “Pennant Fever” from the Major League soundtrack

 

All sound and music used is either public domain or is a short snippet that falls under fair use.

All-Star Wrap-Up and MVP of Yesterday update

Well, that was fun.

To be sure, there have been many better All-Star Games. But there have also been many worse All-Star Games as well. And, what’s more, the festivities themselves were above average- the Home Run Derby, for example, has been reborn thanks to the brackets and time limits. It certainly isn’t perfect, but for the first time in quite awhile, I felt like I was watching the Home Run Derby beyond the first round because I was enjoying it, not simply because it was on.

And then there is Mike Trout. He batted four times last night, and in some ways the game became his showcase. He homered, he walked, he beat out a throw to first to avoid a double play. He rightfully was named MVP, his second in a row (the first player to do that), and he’s only 24. It is not out of the realm of possibility that, one day, the quote “The All-Star Game was made for Willie Mays” will instead be “The All-Star Game was made for Mike Trout.”

Not surprisingly, Trout is the MVP of Yesterday, just as he was the MVP of the game. Standings, as always, after the jump:

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MVP of Yesterday (May 20, 2015): Mike Trout

Trout was 2-5 yesterday, but one of them was a HR, he walked twice, and scored three times. So, he’s the MVP of Yesterday. It was surprisingly a bit of a down day, generally.

Standings, as always, after the jump:

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“30 Teams, 30 Posts” (2015): The Angels’ season, according to OOTP Baseball 2016

In 30 Teams, 30 Posts, I write a post about every MLB team in some way in the lead-up to the beginning of the 2015 season. Previous installments can be found here. Today, we’ve reached the Los Angeles Angels of Angel Stadium of Anaheim, 2000 Gene Autry Way, Anaheim, Orange County, California, USA, North America, Northwestern Hemisphere, Planet Earth, Sol System, Milky Way.

The new Out Of The Park Baseball came out yesterday, and while my review won’t be coming for another week or so, I decided I’d give it a quick spin today to see what it thinks of the Angels for this year. Go below the jump, as this is very image intensive.

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5 Thoughts on The 2014 All-Star Game

1. That was an enjoyable All-Star Game. Not all of them are. Some of them are slogs that you just want to end so that people can stop complaining about it and where it’s obvious at least some of the players who have left the game have also left the stadium to get a flight back to their hometown or their usual team. But this year, it seemed like everybody was actually enjoying themselves.

2. Okay, there were a few blots. The whole controversy over Adam Wainwright grooving a ball for Derek Jeter, for example, which could all be avoided if the whole home-field advantage thing was dropped (it’s believed Chan-Ho Park did something similar for Ripken in 2001, but there wasn’t home-field at stake then, so nobody cared). And, of course, there was the fact that they went the entire broadcast and not once mentioned Tony Gwynn, apparently having kept all the tributes to him in the pre-game on Fox Sports 1, which nobody was watching. I feel like MLB should have some sort of “In Memoriam” montage in the 4th or 5th inning of every All-Star Game, personally. But that doesn’t happen, so it falls to the announcers to pay tribute, and it’s sad that the passing of a man who was a fixture of the All-Star Game for years didn’t get even a mention.

3. As for the game’s theme? Well, it seems like La Opinion in Los Angeles summed it up:

Screen Shot 2014-07-16 at 11.20.12 AMDerek Jeter is leaving. It’s going to be Mike Trout’s league. He deserved the MVP last night, much like he deserved the last two AL MVPs that he didn’t get and will probably deserve the AL MVP he’ll get this year barring injury or some other unforeseen circumstance. He’s going to be the Face of Baseball, the most common ballplayer in commercials (such as the ones for Subway and Major League Baseball itself that he is in now), the ballplayer even people who never watch baseball will be able to name. It was going to happen anyway (especially if Bryce Harper doesn’t pick up the slack) but last night confirmed it.

4. It was nice that Glen Perkins and Kurt Suzuki, the two Minnesota Twins in the game, got to have a spotlight in the 9th as Perkins came in to close in front of his home (and hometown) fans. Sort of surprised that they didn’t bring in Suzuki as a pinch-hitter in the 8th to give the home fans an at-bat by a Twin, though.

5. All five runs by the AL came off Cardinals pitching, so if the Cardinals make it to the World Series and lose in 7, they have nobody to blame but themselves.