2017 WBC Team USA projections Version 1.0

Back during the Blogathon, I did a super-hypothetical projection of what the World Baseball Classic team for the USA would look like if everybody took part, regardless of whether I actually thought they would or not. I called it Version 0.1.

Now, though, it’s time to be more realistic. Not everyone will take part, especially among the pitchers. And, what’s more, the roster will not be a simple gathering of talent. No, there will be role-players: Mark DeRosa, Ben Zobrist, and Willie Bloomquist were on previous WBC teams partly (or, in the case of Bloomquist, almost entirely) because they could play multiple positions. The bullpens will not simply be closers, there will be set-up men and specialists who would only be known to the die-hards.

In addition, there are likely to be rule changes that will allow teams to add players as the tournament goes on, primarily aimed at making it easier for some pitchers to play but who are skittish about going during the early rounds where they might not have had as much time to prepare. For simplicity’s sake, this version of the projections is going to only use a 28-man roster, but sometime in the future I will make projections that reflect the new rules once we officially know what they are.

Now, before we begin (after the jump), a reminder of the WBC roster rules/general wisdom that I use to make these:

  • Any player coming off a major injury or who has a history of injuries is unlikely to participate. This is especially true for the pitchers.
  • Players that will be on new teams are less likely to participate, but shouldn’t be completely ignored, with the exception of pitchers.
  • Teams are made up of 28 players, of which 13 of them must be pitchers and two of them catchers. (This may change pending rule changes.)
  • The pitch count rules make relievers extremely important.

(Go below the jump for the projections)

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2013 WBC Team USA projections Version 2.000001

(EDITED IN ON DEC. 31: As of this writing, the most recent projection for the United States can be found here.)

AGAIN, THIS IS AN OLD PROJECTION, GO TO THE ABOVE LINK FOR THE MOST RECENT!

With Derek Jeter’s injury last night, I already have to make a modification to yesterday’s projected roster. This roster is exactly the same as yesterdays, with the only difference being Jimmy Rollins replacing Derek Jeter (and changes to the lineup as a result).

A refresher on my selection rules/assumptions:

  • Any player coming off a major injury or who has a history of injuries is unlikely to participate. This is especially true for the pitchers.
  • Players that will be on new teams are less likely to participate, but shouldn’t be completely ignored, with the exception of pitchers.
  • Teams are made up of 28 players, of which 13 of them must be pitchers and two of them catchers.
  • The pitch count rules make relievers extremely important.

So after much research and thought, go after the jump for my latest projections for Team USA.

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My roster projections so far for the 2012-2013 World Baseball Classic (as of Aug. 14, 2012)

For those of you who want to see all of my projections for team rosters in the 2013 World Baseball Classic, here’s a list of those I’ve done so far, in order of when I did them, as well as what teams are coming up and I have begun researching and assembling (in a order that is subject to change):

  1. United States of America
  2. Dominican Republic
  3. Venezuela
  4. Mexico
  5. Puerto Rico
  6. Panama
  7. Canada
  8. Australia
  9. The Netherlands (coming soon)
  10. Nicaragua (coming soon)
  11. Colombia (coming soon)
  12. Taiwan/Chinese Taipei (coming soon)
  13. Cuba (coming soon)

?. Japan and Korea (will be up shortly after it becomes official that they will take part- the Japanese union is in a money dispute with the WBC, Korea is undergoing labor strife over the fact that the Korean League is going to expand by only one team instead of the two expected)

2013 WBC Projections: Australia

Australia is sort of a weird country when it comes to baseball. Plenty of people play it, but it’s an afterthought on the national level. They have lots of professional players and even a professional league of their own, but haven’t really produced any full-fledged stars. Internationally, they play well but rarely great, although sometimes they shock the world and do better than anybody was expecting them to. I think it’d be safe to say that baseball in Australia is vaguely like men’s soccer in America, especially when it isn’t a World Cup year. Maybe a bit lower. It exists, there is a league, and there certainly are some good players and a devoted fan-base, but it’s an after-thought unless somebody does something really good.

Anyway, the Australian roster is filled with professionals or former professionals, mostly from the minors and overseas but with a some MLB players here and there.The Australians have a lot of guys who can play anywhere, and as a result, you’ll see some positions where there are no dedicated players of that position.

Keep in mind that this set of projections was made over a long period of time, and while I have tried to keep it up to date, there still may be a stray out-of-date stat or piece of information here and there.

So, after much research, the Australian national team can be found under the jump. The usual rules apply:

  • Any player coming off a major injury or who has a history of injuries is unlikely to participate. This is especially true for the pitchers.
  • Players that will be on new teams are less likely to participate, but shouldn’t be completely ignored, with the exception of pitchers.
  • Teams are made up of 28 players, of which 13 of them must be pitchers and two of them catchers.
  • The pitch count rules make relievers extremely important.

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2013 WBC Team USA projections Version 1.1

(EDITED IN ON DEC. 31: As of this writing, the most recent projection for the United States can be found here.)

I previously did a projection of a possible Team USA for the 2013 WBC, but with injuries and other developments occurring, I’m revisiting it to make some small changes. Where there haven’t been major changes, I haven’t really changed what was said in my original projection. Where I have made changes, I will note it with a section marked CHANGES.

A refresher on my selection rules/assumptions:

  • Any player coming off a major injury or who has a history of injuries is unlikely to participate. This is especially true for the pitchers.
  • Players that will be on new teams are less likely to participate, but shouldn’t be completely ignored, with the exception of pitchers.
  • Teams are made up of 28 players, of which 13 of them must be pitchers and two of them catchers.
  • The pitch count rules make relievers extremely important.

So, with this in mind, and after much looking over of statistics and histories (as well as injury reports), here are my latest round of projections (after the jump):

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2013 WBC Projections: Canada (if they qualify)

It’s a little late for Canada Day, but here are some projections for the Canucks. Well, projections for what they’ll be if they qualify, because they have to: they lost both of their games in 2009, falling to Team USA and then being upset by Italy… on home turf. What’s worse, Canada won’t be able to call upon the major leaguers, as their qualifying pool is this September in Germany, when Joey Votto, Brett Lawrie and friends will be busy. Now, admittedly, a team of minor leaguers and semi-pros from Canada should be able to handle the best that Czech Republic, Germany and the UK will send, but you’d have thought that Canada could handle Italy (even with a few Italian-American ringers), and look how that went.

Still, let’s just assume that Canada qualifies and make the tournament proper, allowing them to get a hold of the rapidly-growing amount of Canadians in MLB. Then they become dangerous, a dark horse that could, conceivably, win the tournament if they got a few breaks here and there. They have lots of guys who can play in lots of places, and

So, as usual, a rundown of the rules, and then the roster after the jump:

  • Any player coming off a major injury or who has a history of injuries is unlikely to participate. This is especially true for the pitchers.
  • Players that will be on new teams are less likely to participate, but shouldn’t be completely ignored, with the exception of pitchers.
  • Teams are made up of 28 players, of which 13 of them must be pitchers and two of them catchers.
  • The pitch count rules make relievers extremely important.

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2012-2013 WBC Projections: Panama

Of all the teams that have failed to win any games over the first two WBCs, the Panamanians probably are the best of the bunch. So it isn’t really a surprise that they will be hosting a qualifying pool in November. That pool is going to be brutal: Panama will be joined by Nicaragua, Colombia and Brazil. All four teams have at least one player active in MLB this season. Thankfully for Panama, their qualifying tournament will be in November and not September, meaning they will be able to call upon some of their major leaguers (as opposed to Canada, which will have to try to qualify without the aid of Joey Votto, Brett Lawrie and friends).

So, anyway, with all of this in mind and after much research, I’ve put together a possible roster for the Panamanians after the jump:

  • Any player coming off a major injury or who has a history of injuries is unlikely to participate. This is especially true for the pitchers.
  • Players that will be on new teams are less likely to participate, but shouldn’t be completely ignored, with the exception of pitchers.
  • Teams are made up of 28 players, of which 13 of them must be pitchers and two of them catchers.
  • The pitch count rules make relievers extremely important.

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